The Trust’s history reflects the changes and challenges that all those seeking to ensure all young people can access similar development opportunities, have faced. 

Lindley’s work has from the start involved residential experiences.  That engaging dynamic where a young person is given a good deal of responsibility for themselves and others, remains as important to us now as it was in the 1960’s.  This was when the Trust acquired its second and namesake centre, Lindley Lodge near Nuneaton.

The early 1970’s saw the Trust’s work expand under the chairmanship of Timothy Royle, providing character training guided by Ian Marsh and commonly using 12 day programmes for young employees. Annual report from 1977

Through the first 30 years of its life Lindley combined its training provision with a Christian community in which many of the staff lived.  This community approach brought a distinct spirit to the residential settings in which the training took place.  The caring community experience remains to this day.

By 1980 the joining of the Hollowford Centre team to what then also included Swinton Castle resulted in increased use of adventurous outdoor activities in personal development for young people.  Under the leadership of the Bishop of Sheffield many of the well established industries of South Yorkshire had helped to develop Hollowford and used it to train their apprentices.  This work continues today though many of the industries have changed! Annual report from 1990

The Trust no longer has Lindley Lodge or Swinton Castle, though routinely works in residential settings beyond its main base at Hollowford.  Its most recent expansion of work is into urban youth clubs to enable an increasing city based population of young people to benefit from the developmental experiences of outdoor adventurous activities.

A full history of the Trust was published in 2015.  ‘Squaring the Circle’ – The Story of the Lindley Educational Trust by Bill Krouwel is available to order in our shop.

Further reading;